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what does cbd stand for

It may also be beneficial for arthritis. Last fall the Arthritis Foundation became the first major health organization to release guidelines for the use of CBD.

CBD is the abbreviation for cannabidiol, one of the many cannabinoids, or chemical compounds, found in marijuana and hemp.

Interest continues to grow. Last year, the federal government pledged $3 billion to research CBD.

What does it do?

In addition to treating epilepsy, research has shown CBD may help reduce anxiety for people who have schizophrenia or psychosis, or who are addicted to opiates.

Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, CBD may even help treat acne.

Advocates believe there are many potential health benefits, but clinicians say more research needs to be done.

The FDA has tested various products and found that many didn’t have the amount of CBD they had advertised, and has often sent warning letters to companies that make unfounded health claims.

CBG is short for Cannabigerol, another of the 120 cannabinoids found in hemp. Both CBG and CBD come from the same parent cannabinoid— Cannabigerolic Acid (CBGa for short.)

Memory and learning

Unlike it’s cousin THC, cannabidiol is not psychoactive. In other words, consuming CBD by itself will not make you feel intoxicated or “high.” This lack of high has even led the World Health Organization to state, “In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential….To date, there is no evidence of public health-related problems associated with the use of pure CBD.”

What does THC stand for?

Perhaps the one cannabinoid better known than CBD, THC stands for Tetrahydrocannabinol. THC is generally a common stand-in for Δ9-THC (delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol,) a schedule I substance in the United States. There is also a similar unscheduled molecule known as Δ8-THC (delta-eight tetrahydrocannabinol) that affects our bodies similarly to Δ9-THC.

THC is best known for its psychoactive properties— inducing euphoria in users, heightened awareness, and time dilation.

CBG research is relatively new and in pre-clinical stages. That said, the benefits of CBG are being studied in animals currently and there are some promising signs:

You should always ask to be provided with a CoA when purchasing (or even looking at) CBD products. Any reputable vendor will happily provide you with one.

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a "high." According to a report from the World Health Organization, "In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD."

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So, you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.

Is cannabidiol legal?

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

CBD is commonly used to address anxiety, and for patients who suffer through the misery of insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both falling asleep and staying asleep.