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is cbd oil legal in alabama

CBD oil derived from industrial hemp containing less than 3% of the psychoactive ingredient THC is legal in Alabama thanks to a 2018 farm bill that removed hemp from the list of controlled substances and made it an agricultural commodity. The legislative amendment paved the way for commercial production of CBD oils sourced from industrial hemp in the state,

There has been a wide variety of health benefits claimed for CBD including reducing stress, anxiety, chronic pain and inflammation as well as easing insomnia. CBD is also used to treat epilepsy and is extremely effective in alleviating some childhood forms of epilepsy syndromes that don’t respond to usual anti-seizure drugs.

Is CBD Oil Legal In Alabama?

For quality assurance, you want to make sure the seller gets each batch of its products tested by a third party. Of course, you should also buy products that are made from organically grown plants. Also, as CBD is a natural compound, most people tolerate it well but consult a doctor before consuming any CBD products if only to ensure it won’t interact with any medicines you’re taking.

As in the rest of the US, CBD has become one of the hottest-selling supplements in Alabama. And there are plenty of outlets selling CBD oil from specialty cannabis shops, to vitamin and supplements, health food, and herbal medicine stores as well as pharmacies. Generally, Alabama’s in-store CBD sellers offer a narrower range of product choices than online outlets. Some of the online outlets are based in Alabama while others are headquartered elsewhere in the US and many of them offer nationwide free shipping.

Alabama, though, still has some of the toughest marijuana laws on its books in the US, and consumption of marijuana-derived CBD oil is illegal in the state. So you want to make sure you’re buying hemp-derived CBD, sourced from industrial hemp containing just trace amounts of THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis. Oil sourced from hemp delivers the medical benefits from cannabis to users but not the high found in marijuana-based products.

The skyrocketing popularity of CBD oil has reached the doors of all 50 states, and Alabama, although not the most sought-after state when it comes to cannabis, followed suit. There is a great demand for CBD oil in Alabama due to its natural wellness and health-enhancing benefits. Luckily, there are plenty of stores where you can purchase a bottle of CBD oil in Alabama, but before we get to that part, it’s great to learn what kind of CBD is legal in the state.
Shall we?

Buying CBD oil online is easy, fast, and convenient. And because the majority of CBD providers are wholesale, you can buy high-quality CBD oil products in bulk at affordable prices. Moreover, buying CBD oil online gives you access to a broad range of different products infused with cannabidiol, including tinctures, balms, extracts, concentrates, isolates, edibles, and pet care products.

Where to Buy CBD Oil in Alabama?

It depends on the source of Cannabidiol. As you probably know, CBD can be derived from both hemp and marijuana varieties of the cannabis sativa plant.
While hemp contains only trace amounts of THC (below 0.3% in general), marijuana is richer in this psychoactive compound. Therefore, different laws apply to marijuana- and hemp-derived CBD oil.

As the popularity of CBD continues to rise, Alabama becomes home to more and more CBD oil stores, with the largest concentrations in the most important cities such as Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile, Tuscaloosa, and Huntsville. If you live near Hoover, Dothan, Decatur, Auburn, or Madison, the chances are that you will find some quality shops there, too.
So, if you’d rather not buy CBD online, we’ve profiled several heads and vape shops in Alabama where you can potentially find Cannabidiol.

Following the 2018 Farm Bill, CBD sourced from industrial hemp is federally legal and applies to all states. Hemp-derived CBD oil falls under the same importation and commerce regulations as other hemp products.
In 2016, the policy HB 393 was enacted to permit hemp cultivation for industrial purposes in Alabama. This legislation permits Alabama companies to create hemp cloth, paper, fuel, and other goods. Industrial hemp is not considered a controlled substance by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

Hemp production and sale, including its cannabinoids and CBD specifically, remain tightly regulated federally. The Farm Bill provides that individual states may also regulate and even prohibit CBD cultivation and commerce. States may attempt to regulate CBD in food, beverage, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products independently of the FDA’s rules.

To meet federal legal criteria, CBD oil must contain no more than 0.3 percent THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Alabama CBD laws

Cannabidiol is a non-intoxicating molecule found in cannabis. It is the second-most abundant-cannabinoid in the plant after THC and has many potential therapeutic benefits, including analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressant properties. CBD can be sourced from either marijuana or hemp plants.

Participants in the Alabama Industrial Hemp Research Program are required to submit several reports regularly to the ADAI. Failure to submit any report, reporting false information, not paying fees, or growing a hemp product that tests above the legal THC limits are all in violation of ADAI regulations. These violations are subject to civil penalties up to $500 and disciplinary sanctions including revocation of an application.

In 2018, Congress passed the Farm Bill and legalized hemp cultivation, creating a pathway to remove cannabis from Schedule 1. The Farm Bill defined hemp as cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC by weight and marijuana as cannabis with more than that amount. Hemp-derived CBD was thus removed from its Schedule 1 designation, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered federally illegal because of marijuana’s federally illegal status. Hemp is considered an agricultural commodity, but still must be produced and sold under specific federal regulations, which were not finalized when hemp was legalized.