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is cbd hemp oil legal in ohio

In one way or another, 33 out of 50 states have managed to legalize marijuana in one form or another. This has been an incredible statistic because the future of medical marijuana relies on such bills. However, medical marijuana is not the same as CBD oil. The question in every Ohio state resident is whether CBD oil is legal in Ohio state.

Hence, police agencies are not allowed to prosecute people found carrying small amounts of hemp-based CBD oil. This is also in correlation with the new laws introduced by the state that states that for CBD oil to be considered legal in the state, it has to have a low THC level of less than 0.3%. If THC goes above the prescribed level, then legal action can be enforced towards to if you are found possessing it.

Is CBD Oil Legal in Ohio?

Yes, CBD oil is legal in the state of Ohio. However, there is a catch, it has to be hemp-derived CBD oil, and it has to have no more than 0.3% THC. The Ohio Board of Pharmacy will only CBD oil bought via the medical marijuana control program dispensary as legal. Hence, CBD bought via any other means in Ohio is considered illegal.

It wasn’t until the Ohio state laws were passed to legalize CBD oil for the sake of the patients, caregivers, and advocates of medical marijuana. Ohio is one of the states among those who have made an initiative to change the laws surrounding hemp, cannabis, and other derivatives like CBD oil for legal and medical use.

Ohio decriminalized hemp when SB 57 was passed in July 2019. A regulatory framework was set up to license hemp cultivation per the federal law. Hence, hemp processors and growers have to be licensed and their CBD products tested.

A 90-day supply can mean different things, depending on the type of material.

The Ohio Department of Pharmacy is authorized to give out up to 60 dispensary licenses across the state.

However, there are a few steps you can take to defend yourself from these less than desirable products.

Recreational Marijuana

Currently, you’re not allowed to grow your marijuana at home.

If you shop online, you’ll save yourself time without the need to go from store to store comparing products and prices. You can quickly compare products with just a few clicks if you place your order with a trusted online supplier.

NOTE: The Ohio Government has been cracking down on CBD sold over the counter. It has seized CBD found in-store from many local shops. Therefore, for the moment, you’re better off placing your order online.

Overall, Ohio is an excellent place to be if you need marijuana. The penalties are relatively light for possession, and the state has a reliable medical marijuana program implemented.

Full-spectrum means that the CBD has been extracted from a hemp plant along with all other chemicals in the plant, including terpenes and trace amounts of THC. Consuming full-spectrum CBD may yield better results due to a phenomenon known as the entourage effect, which happens when cannabis compounds work together to bolster the benefits of the plant.

The Farm Bill also gave the (FDA) authority to regulate CBD product labeling, therapeutic claims, and its use as a food additive. Despite the passage of the Farm Bill, the FDA has taken the stance that even hemp-derived CBD may not be added to food and beverages, nor marketed as a dietary supplement.

SB 57 requires licenses for growing or processing hemp are valid for three years and are not available to anyone convicted of drug-related charges in the past 10 years. No license is required to sell or purchase CBD in Ohio.

Where to buy CBD in Ohio

In July 2019, Ohio passed SB 57, decriminalizing hemp and setting up a regulatory framework to license hemp cultivation. Ohio was one of many states that has regulated industrial hemp production as a crop following the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill.

While major drugstore chains currently sell hemp-derived CBD products in some states, Ohio is not yet one of them. Smaller, local pharmacies and health food stores may offer it. More locations will likely begin to carry CBD products as the state works out its licensing process.

As of September 2019, the FDA does not allow CBD-infused food, drinks, or dietary supplements to be sold, and hasn’t reached a conclusion on regulating hemp-derived CBD products. While the FDA slowly and cautiously approaches making new regulations for CBD products, the gap between regulated products and anything goes grows wider, leaving consumers at risk of buying poor-quality products. When buying CBD products look for these on the label:

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps