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homemade cbd coconut oil

For those who don’t want the effects of THC in their infused coconut oil, you can infuse it with CBD instead. Simply follow the recipe above but use CBD flower instead of THC flower to get the health benefits of CBD.

Another fantastic benefit of using coconut oil is it will remain solid at room temperature. This makes it a great medium for using as a topical agent. Furthermore, its solid state allows the oil to be easily stored via gelatin capsules, a widely popular and highly effective method of consuming cannabis.

These fatty acids are found in abundance in coconut oil, making it a top contender for those looking for a healthier oil base than butter or canola oil.

How to use cannabis coconut oil

Gelatin oil capsules are so simple and easy to make at home—the ingredients can be purchased from just about any pharmacy or online, making for a fun and simple DIY project.

If, however, you don’t have access to a dispensary near you or want to try a fun DIY with your own material, you can always make your own at home. Trust us, you’ll go coconuts for this stuff!

Materials:

Coconut oil has a high concentration of fatty acids (saturated fats). The surplus of these fatty acids in coconut oil create a strong binding agent for cannabinoids.

Furthermore, making cannabis oil is one of the most reliable ways to create medicated edible cannabis products. Even so, it is extremely difficult to determine the exact potency of homemade edibles or cannabis oil. Because of this, it is suggested to consume with caution in very small doses at first. Cannabis oil can be consumed on its own, or added to other edible cannabis recipes.

The cannabinoid compounds found in raw cannabis (THCA and CBDA) are not the same as those found in cannabis that has been heated – such as those inhaled (THC and CBD) when you ignite or vaporize cannabis, or when cooking with cannabis. The process of heating and “activating” cannabis is called decarboxylation. It is what makes cannabis psychoactive, and also more potent for medicinal applications.

Cannabis oil is made by lightly heating (and thus infusing) cannabis in a “carrier oil”. Cannabinoids like CBD and THC, the most active components in cannabis, are both hydrophobic. That means they don’t like water, and are actually repelled by water molecules. On the flip side, CBD and THC are both fat-soluble. They like to bind with fatty acid molecules – such as those found in oil. When cannabis is steeped in oil, the THC and CBD molecules leave the buds or plant material and become one with the oil instead.

Hemp Oil, CBD Oil, THC, or…

Therefore, our cannabis oil recipe calls for decarboxylated cannabis as well. I provide very brief instructions on how to decarb raw cannabis below, but you can read further information about exactly how and why to decarb cannabis in the oven in this article.

On the other hand, simply chopping up weed to add to your brownie mix is not a good idea, for many reasons. As we already explored, cannabinoids are fat-soluble. That means that they not only bind with oils during the infusion process, but also that cannabinoids are more readily absorbed and digested in our bodies when they’re consumed with fat – such as oil. If you add raw cannabis to baked goods, it is less likely that the cannabinoids will bind to fats for a consistent and effective edible experience. Using decarboxylated cannabis to make cannabis oil further increases precision and consistency.

I personally like to use strains that are high in both THC and CBD to make oil and salves. To learn more about the differences between strains, CBD and THC, see this article: “Sativa, Indica & Autoflowers, the Differences Explained”.

Are you interested in making your own cannabis-infused oil? I don’t blame you! Making homemade cannabis oil is a great way to create a highly healing, concentrated, and versatile cannabis product. It is ready to use in edible recipes, topical salves, or even enjoy straight on its own. Especially if you use organic homegrown cannabis like we do, this is an excellent way to use up any extra or “fluffy” stuff too. It also happens to be very easy to make cannabis oil at home!

You have to observe tight temperature control during the CBD extraction process. While heat is necessary to decarboxylate the acids in the hemp plant, turning them into active cannabinoids, unregulated temperatures can also destroy other beneficial hemp compounds, such as terpenes. Temperatures beyond 300 degrees Fahrenheit pose a risk of denaturing essential hemp plant compounds and minimizing your CBD’s efficacy.

Cannabidiol, commonly known as CBD, is among the many cannabinoids present in the cannabis Sativa plant. Unlike Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another cannabinoid in the cannabis plant, CBD is a non-psychoactive compound and doesn’t result in the ‘high’ associated with THC and marijuana use. As such, CBD products offer a legally-permissible way to enjoy the potential benefits of its use. So, how can you make CBD oil with coconut oil? Read on to find out!

Temperature Controls

CBD coconut oil is made from high-CBD strains with minimal THC content. This means that using CBD coconut oil can’t result in the ‘high’ associated with THC. This way, you can use it by applying topically or in foods and drinks without experiencing any psychoactive effects.

Both CBD and coconut oils offer benefits when used separately, and an infusion of the two is like a match made in heaven. CBD coconut oil proves to have more potential benefits than any other cannabis-based oil. Here are some of its potential uses.

Keep in mind that your CBD-infused coconut oil’s shelf life is about two months, but can be extended with refrigeration.