Posted on

does cbd oil help with opiate withdrawal

“CBD may have a role in helping in all three phases, but we don’t know for sure,” said Dr. Danesh Alam, medical director of behavioral health at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital, “We have so much to learn about its [CBD] role in anxiety and addiction in general.”

Because opioid addiction is challenging to study, researchers often have to look at the specific symptoms, which tend to occur in three phases: intoxication, dependence, and relapse.

CBD Oil: What Is It And How Can It Treat Opioid Addiction?

Like any drug addiction, opioid addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder indicated by the compulsive desire to use opioids and loss of control over opioid consumption. When an individual abuses opioids to the point of dependency, they can alter their brain structure.

A recent double-blind study found that acute CBD administration, in contrast to placebo, significantly reduced both cravings for heroin and anxiety induced but the presentation of drug cues (i.e., injection needles).

CBD oil is beginning to receive a lot more attention, as more states legalize marijuana products. Clinical trials have indicated that CBD may be a potential treatment for many conditions, including epilepsy and anxiety. Now, a recent study reports it might also help curb opioid cravings.

The widespread use of heroin and prescription opioids in the United States during the past decade has resulted in an unprecedented epidemic of opioid addiction, and few treatments for heroin use disorders are currently available. In this study, authors conducted a clinical trial to test whether cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid that is found in the cannabis plant, could reduce drug craving and anxiety in recently-abstinent individuals with heroin use disorder. The study found that, compared to those who received a placebo, individuals who received a dose of CBD medication showed a reduction in craving for heroin as well as reduced anxiety, which lasted for about a week after taking the CBD medication.

The study medication used in this study, EPIDIOLEX, is a n FDA-approved medication that is dispensed through a pharmacy (not to be confused with “medical marijuana , ” which is comprised of a wide variety of non- federally- regulated cannabis projects ) . EPIDIOLEX is a plant-derived CBD liquid formation. P articipants were randomly assigned to receive 400 mg of CBD, 800 mg of CBD, or a placebo medication. CBD or placebo was administered once daily for 3 days . In addition to measuring the effect of the medication on opioid craving, anxiety, the authors also collected measures of positive and negative emotions, vital signs (skin temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and salivary cortisol levels , which measure stress response.

WHAT PROBLEM DOES THIS STUDY ADDRESS?

Participants were recruited through advertisements. Most participants indicated preference for intranasal heroin use, most reported currently using more than 10 bags of heroin (one bag = 1 g) daily, and on average, participants had been using heroin for over 10 years. The majority of participants (64.3%) had been abstinent from heroin use for less than 1 month.

This was a randomized clinical trial with 42 participants who received one of two different CBD medication doses or a placebo once daily for 3 days and were then exposed to drug-related or neutral cues to see whether CBD could reduc e opioid cravings and anxiety – factors strongly associated with relapse to opioid use .

Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3.

In order to understand why CBD might be useful to treat opioid addiction, it is helpful to take a closer look at how addiction alters normal behavior. Addiction is broadly defined by the American Psychiatric Association as “a complex condition, a brain disease that is manifested by compulsive substance use despite harmful consequence.” Addiction is classified as a disease because addiction hijacks and alters the way how the brain processes information.

While this study is very exciting, as scientists who study drugs and addiction, we want to stress that this study was very narrow and used specific, standardized amounts of CBD. Thus, the results do not suggest that buying a bottle or jar of over-the-counter CBD is going to help with opioid cravings – or any other medical conditions.

Addiction is a brain disease

Only Epidiolex is FDA-approved for a medical condition – pediatric seizures. All other forms of CBD aren’t regulated. There have been numerous consumer reports that show that the actual amount of CBD in over-the-counter products is significantly less than what is reported on the label. Also, some of these over-the-counter products contain enough THC to show up on drug tests.

Specifically, areas of the brain critical in controlling the perception of daily and pleasurable activities are susceptible to the influence of addictive drugs. Due to the rewiring of the brain under addiction, the individual often perceives the world in context to their drug of choice. The brain learns to associate drug paraphernalia or the physical location of drug partaking in the context of receiving a drug. These cues become integral reminders and reinforcers of drug use.

However, until recently, the only medical indication that CBD has been proven to treat in humans is seizures associated with pediatric epilepsy. Now, however, a recent study suggested that CBD curbed cravings in people with opioid dependence. This is one of the first double-blind controlled trials, the gold standard for drug research, to show benefit of using CBD outside epilepsy treatment. Thus, researchers can say with greater confidence that CBD may be helpful in fighting the war against opioid addiction.