Does CBD Oil Cause Paranoia

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Cannabis is an illegal drug which can affect your mental health. Find out about the effects cannabis can have on your mental health, and how to get support. The largest study of the effects of the main ingredient of cannabis has shown definitively that it can cause short-term paranoia. The Oxford-led research also, for the first time, identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people who take cannabis. Does CBD oil make you feel paranoid? Does CBD oil make you feel paranoid? https://i0.wp.com/thefarmula.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/paranoid.png?fit=1061%2C597&ssl=1 1061 597 The Farmula The

Cannabis and mental health

Cannabis is an illegal drug which can affect your mental health. This page is about the effects that cannabis can have on your mental health. And how to get help and support. You may also find this page if you care for someone who uses cannabis.

If you would like more advice or information you can contact our Advice and Information Service by clicking here .

  • Overview
  • About
  • How does it work?
  • How can it make me feel?
  • Cannabis & mental health
  • Psychosis & schizophrenia
  • Is cannabis addictive?
  • Get help
  • Confidentiality
  • Useful Contacts

Overview

  • Cannabis is known by different names such as marijuana and weed.
  • Cannabis is a drug that can make you feel happy or relaxed. And anxious or paranoid.
  • THC is the main chemical in cannabis which can change your mood and behaviour.
  • Skunk is the most common name for stronger types of cannabis which has more THC.
  • Research has found a link between cannabis and developing psychosis or schizophrenia.
  • Psychosis is when you experience or believe things that other people don’t.
  • Schizophrenia is the name of a mental illness. If you have schizophrenia, you can have psychosis and other symptoms.
  • If cannabis is affecting your health or how you feel, you can see your GP.

Need more advice?

What is cannabis?

Cannabis is an illegal drug made from the cannabis plant. You can smoke or eat cannabis. You can smoke it on its own or mix it with tobacco to make a ‘joint’ or ‘spliff’. It can also be cooked in food or brewed in tea.

People use cannabis for different reasons. Sometimes they use it to relieve mental or physical symptoms. This is called self-medication. This may make you feel better in the short term. But in the longer term it can increase problems or create new ones.

Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in Britain. Young people are more likely to use it than older people.

Cannabis can be called marijuana, dope, draw, ganja, grass, hash, herb, pot, and weed, and other things.
Stronger types of cannabis can be called skunk, super-skunk, Northern Lights, Early Girl and Jack Herer.

You can find more information about cannabis, on the FRANK website. You can find the details of the website in the Useful Contacts section of this page. The website tells you what cannabis looks like, how it is used and the law on cannabis.

How does cannabis work?

Cannabis will go into your bloodstream when smoked. It will quickly be carried to your brain and stick to your receptors. This will affect your mood and behaviour.

Cannabis contains lots of different chemicals known as cannabinoids. Some examples are cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the main active ingredient in the cannabis plant. The more THC there is in cannabis, the greater the effect will be.

Skunk is a stronger variety of cannabis. It contains higher levels of THC. Evidence suggests that the effects of skunk are faster and stronger than milder cannabis.

CBD can lessen the unwanted psychoactive effects of THC such as hallucinations and paranoia. It can also reduce anxiety. This means that the effects of THC will be lower if there is more CBD in the plant.

How can cannabis make me feel?

The effects of cannabis can be pleasant or unpleasant. Most symptoms will usually last for a few hours. But there can be unpleasant long term symptoms. Especially if you used cannabis regularly over a long period of time. The risks can also be worse if are young and smoke strong cannabis, like skunk.

What are the pleasant effects of cannabis?

Cannabis can make you feel happy, relaxed, talkative or laugh more than usual.You may find that colours and music are brighter and sharper. Pleasant effects are known as a ‘high.’

What are the unpleasant effects of cannabis?

Cannabis can cause hallucinations, changes in mood, amnesia, depersonalisation, paranoia, delusion and disorientation. You might find it harder to concentrate or remember things. You may find that you can’t sleep well and you feel depressed. You may also feel hungry or like time is slowing down.

You might have lower motivation. And cannabis can affect how you sense things. You may see, hear or feel things differently. This is known as hallucinating. Hallucinations can be a sign of psychosis.

Psychosis can be a symptom of mental illness, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder. These can be called ‘psychotic illnesses.’

You can use the links below to find out more about:

Or call our General Enquries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

Can cannabis affect my mental health?

Regular cannabis use is linked to an increased risk of anxiety and depression. But most research seems to have a focus on the link between psychosis and cannabis.

Using cannabis can increase the risk of later developing psychotic illness, including schizophrenia. There is a lot of reliable evidence to show a link between the use of stronger cannabis and psychotic illnesses, including schizophrenia. But the link is not fully understood.

Cannabis may be one of the causes of developing a mental illness, but it isn’t be the only cause for many people. Not everyone who uses cannabis will develop psychosis or schizophrenia. And not everyone who has psychosis or schizophrenia has used cannabis. But you are more likely to develop a psychotic illness if you smoke cannabis. And are ‘genetically vulnerable’ to mental health problems.

‘Genetically vulnerable’ means that you are naturally more likely to develop a mental health problem. For example, if people in your family have a mental illness, you may be more likely to develop a mental health problem. if someone in your family has depression or schizophrenia, you are at higher risk of getting these illness when you use cannabis.

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Cannabis can have the following effects.

  • Long term use can have a small but permanent effect on how well you think and concentrate.
  • Smoking cannabis can cause a serious relapse if you have a psychotic illness.
  • Regular cannabis use can lead to an increased risk of later developing mental illness. Especially if you use cannabis when you are young.

For more information, see our ‘Does mental illness run in families’ section Or call our General Enquiries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

What is the difference between psychosis and schizophrenia?

Psychosis and schizophrenia aren’t the same illness.

Psychosis is the name given to symptoms or experiences, which include hallucinations and delusions. Hallucinations make someone experience things differently to other people. This might be seeing things or hearing voices. Delusions are when people have unusual beliefs that other people don’t have.

Schizophrenia is a mental illness that affects how someone thinks or feels. Symptoms of schizophrenia include hallucinations and delusions. But often it will have other symptoms like feeling flat or emotionless, or withdrawing from other people.

Use the links below to find out more about:

Or call our General Enquiries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet

Is cannabis addictive?

Cannabis can be addictive.

About 1 in 10 regular cannabis users become dependent on it. Your risk of getting addicted is higher if you start using it in your teens or use it every day.

You can develop a tolerance to cannabis if you use it regularly. This means you need more to get the same effect.

If you become addicted, you may feel withdrawal symptoms when you don’t use cannabis. For example, you might:

  • be irritable,
  • have cravings,
  • have sleep problems,
  • be restless, and
  • have mood swings.

You might smoke cannabis with tobacco. If you do you may become addicted to nicotine. This means you are at risk of getting diseases such as cancer and heart disease. So, if you stop using nicotine or cut down you could experience nicotine withdrawal too.

You can get information on stopping smoking tobacco by clicking the following link: www.nhs.uk/live-well/quit-smoking/take-steps-now-to-stop-smoking/

How can I get help if cannabis is affecting my health?

Can I see my GP?

Speak to your GP if cannabis use is affecting your physical or mental health. Be honest with your GP about your cannabis use and symptoms. Your GP may not offer you the right support if they don’t know the full picture.

  • offer you treatment at the practice, or
  • refer you to your local drug service.

You can find local drug treatment support by clicking on the following link: www.talktofrank.com/get-help/find-support-near-you

What can my local drug service do?

The service can offer counselling, support groups and advice. They can help you to:

  • reduce your cannabis use,
  • stop using cannabis,
  • reduce the affect that cannabis has on your life, and
  • support you to not start using again.

The service may be provided through the NHS or through charity. You may be able to self-refer to this type of service. If you can’t self-refer speak to your GP or health professional.

Should I be referred to a specialist mental health service?

Your GP should refer you to a specialist mental health service if they think you have psychosis.32 The service could be the Community Mental Health Team or an Early Intervention Psychosis service. Both psychosis and schizophrenia can be treated using antipsychotic medication and talking treatments.

Find out more about:

Or call our General Enquiries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

Can I be excluded from services?

You shouldn’t be excluded from:

• mental health care because of cannabis misuse, and
• a substance misuse service because of psychosis.

Can I see a therapist?

A therapist may be able to help you to understand the reason why you use drugs.

There are lots of different types of therapy. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is suggested as a treatment if:

  • you misuse drugs, and
  • have a common mental health problem such as depression or anxiety.

Or call our General Enquiries teams on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

Can I get further support?

• Speak to a specialist drug service such as Frank.
• Join a support group such as Marijuana Anonymous UK.

Details of Frank and Marijuana Anonymous UK can be found at the end of the factsheet in the ‘Useful contacts’ section.

Find out more about:

Or call our General Enquiries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

What about confidentiality?

You might be worried about telling your GP or other health professionals that you are using cannabis. But health professionals must stick to confidentiality laws. This means that they usually won’t be able to tell other people or services about what you have told them. Unless you agree.

They can only tell other people about what you have said if:

  • there is a risk of serious harm to you or to others,
  • there is a risk of a serious crime,
  • you are mentally incapable of making your own decision, or
  • the NHS share your information under ‘implied consent’.

For example, you might tell your doctor that you are planning to hurt yourself. Your doctor could decide to share this information with or healthcare or social care professionals. They should only do this to protect you and make sure you’re safe.

Find out more about:

Or call our General Enquiries team on 0121 522 7007 and ask them to send you a copy of our factsheet.

Useful Contacts

FRANK
Gives confidential advice to anyone concerned about using cannabis or other drugs.

Telephone helpline: 0300 123 6600. Open 24 hours a day
SMS: 82111 Email: through website
Live chat: through website. Open 2pm – 6pm everyday.
Website: www.talktofrank.com

Marijuana Anonymous
They are run by people who have experience of cannabis use. They offer a 12-step recovery programme for people who want to quit cannabis use and are free to use.

DrugScope
Gives online information on a wide range of drug related topics. They do not have a helpline.

Narcotics Anonymous
They run online meetings and face to face meetings all over the country for people who want to stop using drugs. They offer sponsorship.

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Telephone helpline: 0300 999 1212. Open 10am – 12 midnight.
Website: www.ukna.org

Adfam
A national charity for families and friends of drug users. It offers support groups and confidential support and information.

Telephone admin: 020 3817 9410
Address: 2nd Floor, 120 Cromer Street, London, WC1H 8BS
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.adfam.org.uk

Release
They give free non-judgmental, specialist advice and information to the public and professionals on issues related to drug use and drug laws.

Telephone helpline: 020 7324 2989
Address: 61 Mansell Street, London E1 8AN
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.release.org.uk

Addaction
A charity that supports people to make positive behavioural change. Such as a problem with alcohol, drugs, or mental health and wellbeing. They give support for families too. They have different services in different parts of the country.

Telephone admin: 020 7251 5860
Address: Part Lower Ground Floor, Gate House, 1-3 St. John’s Square, London, England, EC1M 4DH
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.addaction.org.uk

Change Grow Live (CGL)
A charity that supports people to make positive behavioural change. Such as a problem with alcohol, drugs, or mental health and wellbeing. They give support for families too. They have different services in different parts of the country.

Webchat: via website
Website: www.changegrowlive.org/

Turning Point
Works with people affected by drug and alcohol misuse, mental health problems and learning disabilities.

Address: Standon House, 21 Mansell Street, London, E1 8AA
Email: through the website
Website: www.turning-point.co.uk

DNN Help
You can get free rehabilitation treatment through your local drug team. But you can pay for private treatment if you want to. This is an online treatment finder for private rehabilitation services.

How cannabis causes paranoia

The largest study of the effects of the main ingredient of cannabis has shown definitively that it can cause short-term paranoia. The Oxford-led research also, for the first time, identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people who take cannabis.

The research team, led by Professor Daniel Freeman, found that worrying, low self-esteem, anxiety and experiencing a range of unsettling changes in perceptions most likely led to the feelings of paranoia.

‘The study very convincingly shows that cannabis can cause short-term paranoia in some people,’ says Professor Freeman. ‘But more importantly it shines a light on the way our mind encourages paranoia. Paranoia is likely to occur when we are worried, think negatively about ourselves, and experience unsettling changes in our perceptions.’

The study, funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), is the most in-depth investigation ever of the paranoia-inducing effects of the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, THC (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol). Participants were given a range of tests of excessive suspiciousness, including real-life social situations, a virtual reality simulation, self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews.

Paranoia is excessive thinking that other people are trying to harm us. Many people have a few paranoid thoughts, and a few people have many paranoid thoughts

Professor Daniel Freeman

All of those who took part had reported mistrustful thinking in their day to day lives. This is not an unusual sample as approximately half the population report similar paranoid type thoughts occurring in the past month. The scientists tested 121 participants between the ages of 21 and 50, all of whom had taken cannabis at least once before. None of the participants had a history of mental illness and all were screened to rule out relevant health conditions.

Two thirds of the participants were injected with the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis and one-third were injected with a placebo. The dose was equivalent to a strong joint. The advantage of injection was that it reduces variability across participants in how much THC is in the bloodstream during testing, compared to oral or inhalation administration routes. In the study participants, the THC had effects for 90 minutes.

The study found that the main ingredient of cannabis increased the likelihood of paranoia occurring. Half the participants had paranoid thoughts with THC, and 30% with placebo. That is, 1 in 5 participants had an increase in paranoia directly attributable to the THC. The paranoia declined as the drug left the blood stream.

The drug also caused a range of other psychological effects: anxiety; worry; lowered mood; negative thoughts about the self; various changes in perception such as sounds being louder than normal and colours brighter; thoughts echoing; altered perception of time, and poorer short-term memory.

The Oxford researchers used a sophisticated statistical analysis which indicated that it was likely that the increase in the negative feelings and the perceptual changes led to the increase in paranoia. There was no indication that the reductions in short-term memory caused the increase in paranoia.

Professor Daniel Freeman of the Department of Psychiatry explains: ‘Paranoia is excessive thinking that other people are trying to harm us. It’s very common because in our day-to-day lives we have to weigh up whether to trust or mistrust, and when we get it wrong – that’s paranoia. Many people have a few paranoid thoughts, and a few people have many paranoid thoughts.’

The researchers believe the study reinforces the idea that paranoia arises from multiple causes.

‘The study identifies a number of highly plausible ways in which our mind promotes paranoid fears. Worry skews our view of the world and makes us focus on perceived threat,’ says Professor Freeman. ‘Thinking we are inferior means we feel vulnerable to harm. Just small differences in our perception can make us feel that something strange and even frightening is going on.’

He adds: ‘The study provides a great deal more information about the immediate effects of cannabis, but it did not investigate clinically severe disorder. The results don’t necessarily have any implications for policing, the criminal justice system, or legislation. It tells us about the little discussed paranoid-type fears that run through the minds of so many people from time to time. The implication is that reducing time spent ruminating, being more confident in ourselves, and not catastrophizing when unusual perceptual disturbances occur will in all likelihood lessen paranoia.’

The study is reported in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin. As well as funding from the MRC, it also received support from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London.

Does CBD oil make you feel paranoid?

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Many people are affected with anxiety and paranoid thoughts. It makes sense in today’s world, where stressful events seem to be more regular than the climate. Therefore, it is no wonder that people are turning to more natural supplements to help them stay calm and manage their paranoia and anxiety. CBD oil has recently gained a reputation as a miraculous cure for anxiety, but is it true?

As you may know, CBD is another compound from cannabis, just like THC. Both THC and CBD are cannabinoids, a kind of molecule that interacts with the body and generates a “feel good” effect, like endorphins or serotonin. However, you may also know that THC can cause feelings of paranoia and are wondering whether CBD will have the same effect.

What is Paranoia?

Though it is often thought that anxiety and paranoia are similar, and yes, anxiety can cause paranoid thoughts, it also works in the reverse. Paranoia can lead to anxiety.

But what is paranoia if it is not considered anxiety? Simply put, paranoia is a feeling that you are in danger somehow, even when there is no proof that you are. A lot of people can have paranoid thoughts throughout their life, and some individuals may even develop clinical paranoia, which is much more severe.

Clinical paranoia will affect someone most of the time, not just once in a while. They may be able to function normally, but the paranoia could strain relationships. Signs of paranoia include suspicions, fears, mistrust in others, and feelings of betrayal. Paranoid behaviours manifest as hypervigilance, defensiveness, distrust, and inability to remain calm and composed.

Why Can Cannabis Cause Paranoia?

In 2014, British researchers from the University of Oxford looked into reasons why cannabis can make some people relaxed and others extremely paranoid [1]. The study had 121 volunteers between the ages 21 and 50. Every person had used cannabis at least once before. Two-thirds of the group received a high dose THC injection, while the remaining volunteers received a placebo.

After receiving the injection, half of the people who had gotten the THC developed paranoid thoughts. 30 percent who had received the placebo also became paranoid. The researchers concluded that THC could increase the levels of paranoia someone feels, especially when the paranoia started to lessen as THC left the bloodstream. Researchers also found that other psychological factors, such as anxiety, low self-esteem, and worry could be amplified by THC.

Although that is but one study on the nature of THC and paranoia, it does highlight one thing that many already know: that the THC in cannabis affects people uniquely—and not always positively.

Will CBD Cause Paranoia?

Now, we have talked about THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis, but what about CBD? Cannabidiol (CBD) does not affect the endocannabinoid system within your body the same way that THC does. THC will cause a high. CBD does not. While both compounds can work together to create interesting results, it has been noted that CBD will enhance the ability of THC as analgesic (painkiller) while diminishing the paranoia THC sometimes causes [2, 3]. In fact, many of the negative side effects of THC, such as sleepiness, feelings of dysphoria, increased appetite, and so on, are augmented by CBD.

So does that mean that CBD can stop paranoia in its tracks? Is CBD truly the anti-anxiety miracle that many claim it is?

CBD is Anti-Anxiety

As mentioned earlier, CBD is the non-psychoactive compound present in all strains of cannabis, including industrial hemp. When CBD enters your body, it interacts with the CB1 receptor of the endocannabinoid system the same way a neurotransmitter would. For instance, CBD can inhibit a CB1 receptor and cause a decrease in serotonin uptake, which can help depressed people feel happier.

In the same way, CBD will react with receptors that signal anxiety by modulating just how much cannabinoid activity goes on within the body. That explains why CBD can be taken to counteract THC-induced anxiety, as well as paranoid, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Many psychological and mental conditions, like PTSD, are often characterized by overactive or underactive endocannabinoid systems. For example, people with PTSD have been found to produce very little amounts of anandamide, a natural endocannabinoid that functions like THC. So, when cannabinoids like CBD are introduced to the system, it can help regulate the underactive receptors and help those with PTSD deal with their anxiety.

Finding The Right CBD Product For You

If you are interested in trying CBD to treat paranoia, then you need to decide the best method for taking CBD oil. There are plenty of CBD products to try; Farmula has tinctures and salves and oils for every purpose. Yet, not every product is going to work exactly for you like it did someone else. To find the correct CBD product, consider the following:

• Tinctures and sublingual drops are one of the fastest ways to deliver CBD to your bloodstream quickly.
• Edibles take longer to digest into the body, but the overall calming effect will last longer than tinctures and ingestible oils.
• Topical products will do very little for anxiety and paranoid but can do wonders for muscle tension.
• Smoking or vaporizing CBD oil will provide the fastest relief. That said, vaping CBD oil can irritate the lungs and throat.

Keep Calm and Use CBD

So will CBD oil make you paranoid? The chances are very, very low. Most people have reported CBD oil making them feel less paranoid, and there is plenty of research going on to support these findings. Therefore, if you struggle with anxiety or paranoid thoughts and want to try a natural way to relax your body and mind, why not give CBD a try?

Farmula has a wide variety of products to suit all your needs. Give them a try! Want to learn more about CBD first? Check out our other blogs or get in touch with us. Fill out the contact form to get more information delivered right to your inbox.

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