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cbd oil withdrawal

The worst kind of withdrawal symptoms are from heavy drugs or alcohol, and these include:

Pretty scary stuff! So will you have any of these withdrawal symptoms from CBD oil after you stop taking it? The short answer is, no, there should be no new pains, aches, or withdrawal-like symptoms.

CBD oil acts as a supplement that our bodies adapt to after taking it for long periods of time.

What Happens When I Stop Taking CBD Oil?

So what then happens if we stop taking CBD oil? Does our body start going into withdrawals?

There are different types of CBD oil](/learn/different-types-of-cbd-oil) that include:

Medicinal cannabis has only recently become legal in Australia, so there are many questions people have around the two main medicines: CBD oil and THC oil.

The most common questions are “can I drive after taking CBD oil?” and “what happens if I stop taking CBD oil?”

CBD derived from hemp plants contains little to no THC (less than 0.3% according to federal law in the U.S.), and therefore should not put an individual at risk of developing cannabis withdrawal symptoms that might come from heavier THC intake.

Despite growing acceptance and recognition of CBD’s potential benefits, concerns remain about the cannabinoid’s power to cause addiction. This may be due to confusion between non-intoxicating CBD and its intoxicating counterpart, THC. Because of the way CBD interacts with receptors in the body’s endocannabinoid system, it doesn’t have the psychoactive effects of THC. In fact, CBD basically blocks THC’s access to those receptors found throughout the nervous system, thereby reducing some of THC’s effects.

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Marijuana-derived CBD is extracted from marijuana plants that are usually grown for their intoxicating properties. Unlike hemp-extracted CBD, marijuana-derived CBD oil often contains levels of THC that exceed the federal 0.3% limit. In the event the CBD oil has particularly high levels of THC, an individual could possibly experience cannabis withdrawal symptoms if the oil was used to excess. CBD oil with THC levels above 0.3% is only available in states with medical or adult-use cannabis legalization.

CBD oil can be sourced from both hemp and marijuana. CBD derived from hemp has little to no trace of THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

A 2011 study concluded that CBD has a better safety profile compared to THC and other cannabinoids. Researchers found that high doses of CBD of up to 1,500 milligrams per day were well-tolerated by the human subjects. Compared with THC, CBD did not impair motor or psychological functions, nor did it alter the heart rate, blood pressure, or body temperature.

I just wish when I was 15 I was vaping medical flower instead of smoking reggie out of blunt wraps. That’s what “safety” the DEA’s great drug war bought me. Our tax dollars at work.

Some people get into serious trouble with cannabis, and use it addictively to avoid reality. Others depend on it to an unhealthy degree. Again, the number of people who become addicted or dependent is somewhere between the 0% that cannabis advocates believe and the 100% that cannabis opponents cite. We don’t know the actual number, because the definitions and studies have been plagued with a lack of real-world relevance that many studies about cannabis suffer from, and because the nature of both cannabis use and cannabis itself have been changing rapidly.

Unfortunately, the study in JAMA doesn’t seem particularly generalizable to actual cannabis users. This study is a meta-analysis — a study which includes many studies that are deemed similar enough to lump together, in order to increase the numerical power of the study and, ideally, the strength of the conclusions. The authors included studies that go all the way back to the mid-1990s — a time when cannabis was illegal in the US, different in potency, and when there was no choice or control over strains or cannabinoid compositions, as there is now. One of the studies in the meta-analysis included “cannabis dependent inpatients” in a German psychiatric hospital in which 118 patients were being detoxified from cannabis. Another was from 1998 and is titled, “Patterns and correlates of cannabis dependence among long-term users in an Australian rural area.” It is not a great leap to surmise that Australians in the countryside smoking whatever marijuana was available to them illegally in 1998, or patients in a psychiatric hospital, might be substantively different from current American cannabis users.

Disclaimer:

Once I started looking at my own cannabis use as therapeutic, got my medical card, and was able to afford it, a huge portion of my “negative consequences associated with cannabis use” vanished. Now I walk past the cops with my bag as I leave the dispensary, I know the strain I’m getting, and I’m not scraping resin because I’m not paying near what I used to.

I’d never say to someone who was using another drug to treat a chronic health problem, “Oh, you take that medicine every day? Don’t you ever give it a rest? You lousy addict!”

Moreover, the JAMA study doesn’t distinguish between medical and recreational cannabis, which are actually quite different in their physiological and cognitive effects — as Harvard researcher Dr. Staci Gruber’s work tells us. Medical cannabis patients, under the guidance of a medical cannabis specialist, are buying legal, regulated cannabis from a licensed dispensary; it might be lower in THC (the psychoactive component that gives you the high) and higher in CBD (a nonintoxicating, more medicinal component), and the cannabis they end up using often results in them ingesting a lower dose of THC.

As for supplements, some have tried n-acetyl-cysteine and others have tried CBD — there isn’t great evidence for the effectiveness of either at this point.