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cbd oil stops seizures

Although CBDPure has a very narrow product range — offering only CBD oil and capsules — they seem to have perfected these products. All extracts from CBDPure are obtained using supercritical CO2 and tested in a certified laboratory for quality assurance.

In June 2018, the FDA approved the first CBD-based drug. The oral spray, called Epidiolex, contains 99% pure CBD. It’s used for treatment-resistant forms of childhood epilepsy — such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

4. CBDistillery

I’ve been taking the Gold Bee CBD oil for 30 days, using the dosage based on the recommended serving size. At first I was skeptical because I got used to higher doses in my routine — low doses could hardly calm my nervous system.

This concentration translates into 40 mg of CBD in each milliliter. The oil has been suspended in premium-grade MCT oil and infused with natural terpenes to enhance the synergy between CBD and other compounds in hemp. There are two flavors available: natural and kiwi. The kiwi flavor is sweetened with organic honey, which only adds to the product’s value.

For each individual, the optimal CBD dosage will depend on the following:

Some other CBD products contained other compounds from the marijuana plant, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)—the part that gets you “high.”

A 2017 study published in JAMA found that 26 percent of products purchased online contained less CBD than their labels claimed.  

However, LGS and Dravet syndrome may be treated with medications that aren’t commonly used for most types of epilepsy. Additionally, they often require two or more anti-seizure drugs for seizures to be under control.

Warning

When used with other anti-seizure drugs, CBD can cause elevated liver enzymes, which is often a sign of liver injury.

Anti-seizure medications should be taken at the regularly scheduled times without skipping or combining doses.

Seizures are caused by erratic electrical activity in the brain that can spread and cause uncontrolled physical movements and/or alterations of consciousness. Most anti-seizure drugs work by slowing down excitatory nerve activity in the brain.

However, these products aren’t regulated by the FDA and are largely untested. The FDA has warned that CBD products are often mislabeled or overpromise their supposed benefits.  Dosage and quality are likely to be far less consistent with other CBD products, which may put you at risk for more seizures.

“This can be really beneficial to patients,” said Michael Watkins, M.D., assistant professor of pediatric neurology with McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Watkins works at the Pediatric Epilepsy Clinic at UTHealth, where about 20 patients have been prescribed CBD oil. He said the stigma associated with taking medicine derived from cannabis is fading.

Teachers told Shena that Trysten was less distracted at school and that his performance had improved. In his first 30 days on his new treatment, he had just one seizure. He hasn’t felt this well for the past three years.

Perhaps the biggest hurdle of all is price. The Pearsons pay $350 per month for Trysten’s CBD oil—a typical amount—and the cost isn’t covered by insurance. That’s unlikely to change, experts say, as long as the federal government views cannabis as a Schedule I drug with no accepted medical use. In May, a federal appeals court sided with the Drug Enforcement Administration, ruling that CBD oil is a Schedule I controlled substance. But in June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex, a CBD oral solution to treat seizures associated with rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

Across Texas, doctors and patients are now finally able to take advantage of a three-year-old law that makes cannabidiol oil, or CBD oil, available to some epilepsy patients. CBD oil is derived from the cannabis plant, also known as marijuana. CBD oil provides symptom relief without intoxicating effects.

For the Pearsons, cannabis was a last resort to relieve Trysten’s epilepsy after years of other treatments failed to provide relief.

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“It’s kind of risky, but these parents and families are desperate for their kids,” said Gretchen Von Allmen, M.D., chief of pediatric epilepsy with McGovern Medical School at UTHealth and a pediatric neurologist at Memorial Hermann-TMC.