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cbd oil prostatitis

Did you see Bill Turnbull: Staying Alive on Channel 4? It’s a powerful documentary that follows the TV presenter and journalist currently living with advanced prostate cancer as he goes through chemotherapy, tries diets and complementary therapies, and speaks to others with the disease, including Stephen Fry.

Also, cannabinoids can have side effects that are unpleasant or even harmful. It’s important to remember that the cannabinoids used in studies are made in a laboratory and are only one of many chemicals that are found in cannabis. Street-bought (recreational) cannabis contains chemicals that can cause you to hallucinate and could harm your mental health.

Q. Can cannabis help cure prostate cancer?

This is a topic people often call us about. Eating healthily, being physically active and staying a healthy weight is important for general health, but can be especially important for men with prostate cancer.

At the moment, we don’t know if cannabis can help treat prostate cancer. Some studies have looked at the effect of chemicals in cannabis, called cannabinoids, on prostate cancer cells. There are two main cannabinoids that have been investigated – THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). The studies found that cannabinoids may stop prostate cancer cells from growing and dividing, cause prostate cancer cells to die, and stop prostate cancer cells from invading other tissues and spreading.

Many of you had questions and comments about the show. Here, one of our Specialist Nurses, Sophie, answers some commonly asked questions.

These patients include those who have localised prostate cancer where active surveillance is followed, those with biochemical recurrence after treatment, and patients with metastatic PCa. I have always wondered whether cannabis oil could indeed be a cure for prostate cancer. Unfortunately, I do not see in practice the desired beneficial effect and the PSA values continue to rise. To find some answers, I did a search in scientific literature.

Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) is mainly found in the brain, and also in the lungs, the reproductive organs, etc. Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is usually located in the immune system and in the bones. THC mainly works on CB1 receptors, CBD on CB2 receptors.

– Nausea and vomiting: An initial study in 1975 showed a beneficial effect of THC on nausea induced by chemotherapy. Subsequently, two systematic reviews showed benefits of cannabinoids in nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, but most studies were observational or uncontrolled.

In the 1990s, the endocannabinoid system (ESC) of the body was discovered by Raphael Mechoulam, an Israeli professor of medical chemistry. The endocannabinoid system, a central regulatory system, is the body’s largest receptor system and is important to maintain the homeostasis of the body.

Cannabis, a very easy plant to grow, has been used for centuries for its medicinal properties. The oldest known document about cannabis use originates from the Chinese emperor Shen Nung in 2727 B.C. It suggested that cannabis has a neuron-protective effect. The Egyptians used cannabis to treat glaucoma and as an anti-inflammatory agent (inflammation of the eyes, fever). Cannabis was even used in obstetrics (mixed with honey) and the mixture was applied in the vagina to “cool” the uterus. In the Old Testament, there is also an account of God instructing Moses to make a holy anointing olive oil-based “Kaneh Bosm.”

Perhaps today’s trend of relaxing cannabis restrictions will open the path to human clinical trials, and the real value of cannabinoids in the treatment of prostate cancer will be revealed.

Ramos & Bianco explicitly describe a constructive scenario for prostate cancer patients with painful metastasis to the bone. As they state, cannabinoids “harbor analgesic properties that aid bone cancer pain, reduce opioid consumption, side effects, and dependence, as well as exhibiting anti-androgenic effects on experimental prostate cancer cells.”

Research shows that prostate cancer cells have higher levels of expression of both CB1 and CB2 receptors than normal cells. To put it another way, the cancer cells have a greater affinity for cannabinoids than normal cells. Laboratory studies[iv] have demonstrated that when the cells are treated with a specific cannabinoids, three consequences occur:

The current state of cannabinoids and prostate cancer

[iv] Sarfaraz S, Afaq F, Adhami VM, Malik A, Mukhtar H. Cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells LNCaP proceeds through sustained activation of ERK1/2 leading to G1 cell cycle arrest.J Biol Chem. 2006 Dec 22;281(51):39480-91.

[iii] Ramos J, Bianco F. The role of cannabinoids in prostate cancer: basic science perspective and potential clinical applications. Indian J Urol. 2012 Jan-Mar;28(1):9-14.

Cannabinoids produce their physical and psychological effects by interacting with specific receptors on cell surfaces that have an affinity for these compounds. There are two types of receptors:

With such promising research evidence that cannabinoids are destructive to prostate cancer cells, what is happening with actual prostate cancer patients? Not much, according to a prostate.net blog: