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cbd oil dosage for seizures

2. Alger BE. Seizing an Opportunity for the Endocannabinoid System. Epilepsy Curr. 2014;14(5):272-276.

How much CBD should I take for epilepsy and seizures?
What is the best CBD oil for epilepsy and seizures?
How does CBD work to effect epilepsy and seizures?
What are the side effects of CBD?

About Sleep: Often times, certain conditions or side-effects from medication can create insomnia. Sleep is essential to the bodies healing and recovery process. If sleep deprivation is an issue, you may want to consider weighting your dosage heavier at night to assist with a more sound sleep.

5. Sublingual Oils vs Vapor – Which Are Best?

For your convenience, and to assist with your research, we have assembled an index of published studies on CBD as a treatment for epilepsy. For more information on the studies relating to the use of CBD for epilepsy and seizure therapy, go to this page.

(Let’s get the legal stuff out of the way first)

Important Note: Typically, people decide to try CBD because of a specific condition, only to find it helps other areas of their body as well. Remember, your endocannabinoid system runs throughout the entire body at a cellular and sub-cellular level. CBD is a whole-body compound. When you start taking CBD for the first time, pay attention to everything going on in your body. Do not be surprised if you find various benefits from your dosage.

for the treatment of two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. 1 ( https://www.fda.gov/newsevents/newsroom/pressannouncements/ucm611046.htm )

CARE-E is a multi-center, phase 1, open-label, dosage escalation study using a Health Canada approved and Good Manufacturing Practices certified 1:20 THC:CBD CHE as adjunct therapy to treat children with epileptic encephalopathy. The primary objectives were to assess the safety and efficacy of CBD-enriched CHE, whereas secondary objectives included an analysis of trough steady state (CSS, Min) levels of CBD, THC, and cannabichromene (CBC); as well as an assessment of the correlation between cannabinoid levels and therapeutic effect. CBC levels were measured as the CHE used in this study contained 4% CBC by volume. We present results for seven CARE-E participants recruited at the University of Saskatchewan site.

Following a month of CBD at 5–6 mg/kg/day, the four participants with a >50% reduction in average daily seizure frequency, had CSS, Min CBD levels ranging from 14.8 to 24.4 ng/mL. After a month of CBD at 10–12 mg/kg/day, the five participants with a >50% reduction in average daily seizure frequency, had CSS, Min CBD level ranging from 42.5 to 124.7 ng/mL. The CSS, Min CBD levels corresponding with the CBD dosage at which the three participants became seizure free, ranged from 54.8 to 78.9 ng/mL ( Figure 3A ).

Trial Design

Prior to enrollment, written and informed consent was obtained from the child’s parents or legal guardian. This study received a No Objection Letter (NOL) from Health Canada, was approved by the University of Saskatchewan Biomedical Research Ethics Board and registered with ClinicalTrials.gov ( <"type":"clinical-trial","attrs":<"text":"NCT03024827","term_id":"NCT03024827">> NCT03024827).

Participant A-04 had slight elevations of AST at Visits 3 and 6 (48 U/L and 44 U/L, respectively -reference: 10–40 U/L). GGT was elevated prior to, and remained elevated throughout, the study, reaching a peak of 88 U/L at Visit 4. Participant A-04’s serum lipase at 173 U/L (normal: 22–51 U/L) was significantly elevated at Visit 5. As he was asymptomatic and an abdominal ultrasound was normal, he continued to receive CHE. By Visit 6, lipase levels decreased to 83 U/L and returned to normal following the study after valproic acid dosing was decreased and CHE was continued at 10–12 mg/kg/day.

Cannabinoid CSS, Min plasma concentrations were measured at the end of each subsequent month’s dosage escalation ( Figures 3A–F ). With each dosage escalation, CBD and CBC CSS, Min values generally increased proportionally with dose in all participants, except for participant A-04, whose last dose escalation resulted in non-proportional increases in both CBD and CBC CSS, Min values ( Figures 3A–C ).

cannabidiol will increase the level or effect of phenytoin by affecting hepatic enzyme CYP2C19 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Consider reducing the dose of sensitive CYP2C19 substrates, as clinically appropriate, when coadministered with cannabidiol.

Monitor Closely (1) cannabidiol will increase the level or effect of tofacitinib by affecting hepatic enzyme CYP2C19 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Consider reducing the dose of sensitive CYP2C19 substrates, as clinically appropriate, when coadministered with cannabidiol.

Monitor Closely (1) clotrimazole will increase the level or effect of cannabidiol by affecting hepatic/intestinal enzyme CYP3A4 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Consider reducing the cannabidiol dose when coadministered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor.

Serious – Use Alternative (1)

Monitor Closely (1) bicalutamide will increase the level or effect of cannabidiol by affecting hepatic/intestinal enzyme CYP3A4 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Consider reducing the cannabidiol dose when coadministered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor.

Monitor Closely (1) cannabidiol, theophylline. affecting hepatic enzyme CYP1A2 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Owing to the potential for both CYP1A2 induction and inhibition with the coadministration of CYP1A2 substrates and cannabidiol, consider reducing dosage adjustment of CYP1A2 substrates as clinically appropriate.

Monitor Closely (1) verapamil will increase the level or effect of cannabidiol by affecting hepatic/intestinal enzyme CYP3A4 metabolism. Modify Therapy/Monitor Closely. Consider reducing the cannabidiol dose when coadministered with a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor.

Serious – Use Alternative (1) cannabidiol will increase the level or effect of tucatinib by Other (see comment). Avoid or Use Alternate Drug. Coadministration of tucatinib (a CYP2C8 substrate) with a strong or moderate CYP2C8 inhibitors increases tucatinib plasma concentrations and risk of toxicities.