CBD Flower To Oil Ratio Calculator

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This printable cannabis flower to oil ratio guide will help you decide how much to use so you end up with a perfectly potent product. Infusing your food with cannabis is a common practice among many users. It's important to how strong your edibles are so you can medicate responsibly. Trying to determine the potency of your infusions? We’ll show you how to calculate accurate flower-to-oil ratios for your homemade edibles.

Cannabis Flower-to-Oil Ratio Guide & Printable Chart

Published: Nov 9, 2021 · Modified: Sep 4, 2022 by Emily Kyle · This post may contain affiliate links, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Are you ready to make cannabis butter or oil but are stuck wondering how much to use? This cannabis flower-to-oil ratio guide will help you decide how much so you end up with a perfectly-potent end product suited to your tolerance and needs.

Features

  • An easy-to-use guide to determine how much flower, kief, or trim and how much oil or butter to use in your infusions
  • Expert tips to help you determine your tolerance level
  • An option to download and print both the 1:1 and 1:2 chart

Why You Will Love This Guide

Edibles are a great way to consume cannabis to find relief from unwanted symptoms, but if you’re buying them from a dispensary, the costs can add up.

That’s why so many of my Well With Cannabis Community members love to save money by making edibles at home.

This can be done with a simple infusion of cannabis flower and fat like butter, coconut oil, or olive oil.

But the same question is always asked, how much cannabis and oil should I use?

It’s a great question because how much of each you decide to use will impact the potency of your final product.

This guide will discuss how you can determine the perfect flower-to-oil ratio for your infusion so you can get your chill on and save money simultaneously!

How to Use The Ratio Chart

The easy-to-use chart above will help you decide how much flower and oil to use based on how big you want your final batch to be.

This works for infusions that are made in a crockpot, Instant pot, or even an infusion machine, depending on the capacity it can hold.

The chart has two parts, a 1:2 ratio (1 ounce to 2 cups) and a 1:1 ratio (1 ounce to 1 cup).

But which chart should you use?

One of the best parts about making cannabis infusions is that you can make them as strong or mild as you prefer.

If you have a low tolerance or are looking for a mild dose, you should use the 1:2 ratio chart listed first.

If you have a high tolerance or are looking for a stronger dose, you can reference the second chart and use a 1:1 ratio.

For a 1:1 example, one ounce of decarboxylated flower will be mixed with one cup of butter.

This will create an infusion twice as potent as if you were to use the 1:2 ratio.

When deciding which ratio to pick, consider your tolerance, and if you’re new to edibles, be sure to follow the golden rule of “start low and go slow.”

Other Factors to Consider

As a general rule, it’s essential to know that the more cannabis flower you add to your infusion, the more potent your edibles will be.

You can also increase the potency by decreasing the amount of oil or butter to get the same effect.

My flower-to-oil ratio chart above breaks it down so you can easily and accurately mix the right amounts – but there are a few other factors to consider as well.

The Potency Of The Flower

While the amount of flower and oil you use matters, so does the potency of the flower you’re using.

Cannabis flowers can contain anywhere between 0-30% cannabinoids or the important compounds we want like CBD, CBG, and THC.

Different strains can have different percentages of cannabinoids. Without lab testing, it is impossible to know this exact number.

If you purchased cannabis from a dispensary, it should come with a lab report or printed number stating the total percent of cannabinoids in the product.

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If you grew your flower and know the strain you used, online resources like Leafly should be able to give you an average percentage of what the strain typically produces.

Remember, the higher the percentage of cannabinoids, the more potent the final infusion will be.

If You’re Working With Trim

The chart above is was designed with the thought that you would be using traditional cannabis flower buds.

But what if you want to make an infusion with trim or shake?

If you’re working with trim, I typically recommend you double the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because trim, like fan leaves or sugar leaves, is typically less potent than flowers, so doubling up on the amount will help keep the potency higher.

Of course, this is just a rough guesstimate, and will again depend on the strength of the flower and your personal tolerance.

If You’re Working With Kief

Again, the chart above is was designed for using cannabis flower buds.

However, if you’re lucky enough to have collected a nice amount of kief, you can easily infuse it into butter or oil.

If you’re working with kief, I typically recommend you *at least* halve the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because kief has the potential to be anywhere between 50-70% more potent than traditional cannabis flower due to its high trichome content.

Take care when preparing a kief oil or kief butter, as they can be very potent depending on how they are made.

A Calculator Can Help

While it is no substitute for lab testing, an online calculator can help you determine the potency of your final product.

For this to work, you will need to know the potency of the material you are working with or at least have a general idea.

You can input values into my edibles dosage calculator and see the final potency before infusing.

Get To Know Your Tolerance

By changing the amount of flower to oil in your recipe, you can manipulate the final product to be as potent as you’d like.

The more flower you use, the more potent it will be. The more oil you use, the more you will dilute the infusion.

Since cannabis affects everyone differently and the endocannabinoid system is highly individualized from person to person, it’s essential to know your tolerance level.

Cannabis enthusiasts agree that the best way to consume THC edibles safely is to “start low and go slow.”

That way, you are less likely to experience the unpleasant side effects of too much THC consumption, like anxiety and paranoia.

It’s always advised to start with a low flower-to-oil ratio for your first batch of edibles and see whether it meets your needs.

If it’s not as potent as you’d like, you can try a stronger ratio next time.

To find the perfect ratio for your tolerance level, keep experimenting with different amounts of cannabis flower and oil.

Once you’ve got the right potency, you’ll be able to make all kinds of edible recipes at home on your own.

Traditionally, cannabis brownies are a fan favorite, but you can make anything from cookies and candies to no-bake edibles and more with your infusions.

Whether you’re just beginning your journey into homemade cannabis-infused treats, or if you’re a seasoned baker, this flower-to-oil ratio chart will help as a quick guide.

Looking For More Support?

Join thousands of members inside my private Well With Cannabis Community to ask questions, find support, and share your edible creations!

Want To Make This Easier? Use A Machine!

If the process of decarbing and infusing feels like too much work, an all-in-one countertop device may be a perfect all-in-one solution.

My personal favorites? The LEVO and Ardent FX, but you can review the most popular infusion machines here.

Want A Discount Code?

My Edibles Made Easy Online Cooking Course will teach you how to easily make cannabis edibles and topical recipes at home. This step-by-step video course will teach you how to infuse, extract, and create edibles with many different product types – all from the comfort of your own home.

Learn more and enroll today →

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Infusing Your Food With THC & CBD

In this first section, you can calculate the potency of your infused oil, alcohol, or fat product that can later be used directly in your recipe using the second section of this calculator.

Cannabis Product in Grams
Cups of Oil, Alcohol, or Fat
Total mg of THC
Total mg of CBD
Total mg of THC per teaspoon
Total mg of CBD per teaspoon

Creating Portions/Servings

In this second section, you can add the infused oil you made in step one directly into any recipe.

Teaspoons of oil in your recipe
Servings in your recipe
Total mg of THC in entire recipe
Total mg of CBD in entire recipe
Total mg of THC in per serving
Total mg of CBD per serving

*Cannabinoids are lipophiles and they bind very easily with fats and oils such as butter, lecithin, vinegar, and even alcohol. Whatever you use for your infusion, make sure that the cannabinoids will be able to bind to it.

Yes you can, just make sure to enter a zero before the decimal point such as 0.5 grams. This can be useful for when you are using concentrates in your infusion.

If you have made a purchase from a licensed dispensary, they should be required to label all of their products appropriately. Every state mandates different labeling regulations, so make sure you are aware of those. Otherwise, you’ll have to rely on strain guides and estimates for where your product falls which will not give you accurate results.

It really ranges from person to person and what you have eaten up to the point where you take your edibles. The general recommendation is to wait at least an hour to start to feel the effects so that you can best gauge your comfort level.

Understanding Flower-to-Oil Ratios for Your Cannabis Infusions

When most home cooks make cannabis edibles, they usually resort to guesswork for determining potency. That can be fine if you’re only making edibles for yourself, and you know your tolerance. But when you’re sharing with friends, you won’t want to freak them out with too much THC or put them to sleep with a heavy CBD dosage.

So, how do you calculate the potency of your infusions? Join us, and we’ll show you how to calculate accurate flower-to-oil ratios for your homemade edibles.

Calculating Flower-to-Oil Ratios

You’ll need to consider several variables when calculating flower to oil ratios for your edibles, including:

  • how many grams of flower your using
  • the potency of the flower
  • the approximate infusion rate
  • the amount of oil or butter
  • the number of servings

The type of oil and the time infused makes a difference in the infusion rate. Unfortunately, there’s no way to know exactly what the infusion rate will be. For this article, we’ve chosen a relatively high infusion rate, but rates can range down to 60% or even lower.

The calculations that follow will give you an estimate of the potency of your edibles. However, if you want to know exactly how many milligrams of THC or CBD are in your infusions, you’ll have to send them to a lab or test them with an at-home cannabis potency tester .

Calculating the milligrams of THC or CBD in your cannabis

The first step in calculating your flower-to-oil ratio is to find out how many milligrams of cannabinoids are in your flower. You can convert the number of grams of cannabis to milligrams by multiplying it by 1000. Then, use the following equation to find out how many milligrams of THC or CBD are in your bud:

milligrams of cannabis x % of THC or CBD= total cannabinoids in milligrams

For example, let’s say you have 5 grams of flower, which equals 5000 mg. If your bud has 20% THC, you simply multiply 5000 by 20%, and you’ll get a total of 1000 milligrams of THC.

Finding out the amount of infused cannabinoids

Once you determine how much THC or CBD is in your flower, you’ll need to estimate how many milligrams will actually infuse into your oil. As we’ve mentioned before, the infusion rate varies according to the type of oil you use and how long you cook the mixture. For this article, we’ll use an 80% infusion rate. Here’s the math:

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1000 mg THC x 80%= 800 milligrams of infused THC

Determining the total amount of cannabinoids in a batch of edibles

Here’s the equation you’ll need to find out how much CBD or THC is in your entire batch of edibles:

total infused cannabinoids divided by amount of infused oil you use in the recipe

If you initially infused two cups of oil and plan to use ¼ cup in your edibles, you’ll divide the total infused cannabinoids by eight. (You’re using an eighth of the total two cups of oil.) Here’s what the math looks like for our previous example:

800 mg infused THC divided by 8 = 100 mg of THC in your whole batch of edibles

Calculating the amount of cannabinoids per serving

This part is relatively straightforward. Let’s say you plan on making 10 servings:

100 mg total THC in the batch divided by 10 servings = 10 mg per serving

Now that you have the basic information you’ll need, let’s take a look at a few real-life scenarios for practice.

Scenario #1: CBD-Infused Dinner Party

Imagine that you’re planning a dinner party for four of your closest friends. Your meal plan includes CBD-infused gravy, and you want to make sure that each guest can have two portions. For this scenario, you’ll be working with the following variables:

  • 7 grams of hemp flower with 16% CBD
  • 4 sticks of butter (1 stick used in the gravy)
  • 80% infusion rate
  • 8 servings (4 guests x 2 portions)

You can calculate the approximate potency per serving in the following manner:

  1. Total cannabinoids in milligrams: 7 grams in milligrams equals 7000 mg. 7000 mg times 16% is 1120 milligrams of CBD in the hemp flower.
  2. Total infused CBD: 1120 mg x 80% = 896 total infused CBD
  3. Total cannabinoids in your gravy: 896 total infused CBD divided by 4 equals 224. (You’re using ¼ of your infused butter in your recipe.)
  4. Milligrams of CBD in each serving: 224 divided by 8 servings yields 28 mg of CBD per serving.

Maybe those seem like hefty servings, but we’re assuming your dinner guests are already experienced with CBD. If you wanted to reduce the potency of your gravy, you could simply use ½ stick of CBD-infused butter and ½ stick of regular butter, which would give you eight 14 mg servings of CBD gravy.

Scenario #2: Old-Fashioned Pot Brownies

In this scenario, you want to make two dozen brownies that you can share with friends and store in the freezer when you need a little pick-me-up. You plan to make them on the weak side so that you can enjoy a lighter buzz or eat two for a full-blown trip. Here are the variables you’re managing:

  • 6 grams of cannabis with 18% THC
  • 2 cups of coconut oil (½ cup used in brownie recipe)
  • 80% infusion rate
  • 24 brownies

Here’s the procedure for calculating the milligrams of THC per brownie:

  1. Total THC in milligrams: 6 grams equals 6000 milligrams. 6000 mg times 18% THC equals 1080 milligrams of THC.
  2. Total infused THC: 1080 mg multiplied by 80% is 864 mg of THC.
  3. Total THC in your batch of brownies: 864 mg divided by 4 equals 216 mg. (We’re using ¼ of our coconut oil.)
  4. Milligrams of THC in each brownie: 216 mg divided by 24 brownies is 9 milligrams of THC.

Now, you have 24 lightly dosed brownies you can feel confident sharing with friends or enjoying when you require a slight attitude adjustment.

As we’ve mentioned before, these calculations will only give you an approximation of the potency of your edibles since it’s impossible to pin down exact infusion rates. If you would like to know the precise amount of cannabinoids in your infusions, you may be interested in our at-home cannabis potency tester . tCheck works for all types of infusions, tinctures, and distillates . Our devices even include a convenient, onboard recipe calculator .

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