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cbd depression study

Another study found that CBD had a “clear anti-stress effect,” which might play a role in reducing stress levels that contribute to feelings of anxiety and depression.  

CBD holds promise, but that does not mean that you should turn to cannabidiol products over traditional treatments for depression.

How It’s Taken

It is also important to note that CBD is available in isolate (only CBD), broad-spectrum (contains other cannabinoids but not THC), and full-spectrum (contains other cannabinoids, including THC).

If you are experiencing symptoms of depression, it is important to talk to a doctor or mental health professional. Depression may worsen over time if left untreated, but there are effective treatments available including psychotherapy and medications.

Research suggests that CBD has antidepressant effects, although it is important to note that many of these are animal studies.  

The remaining studies were either case series or case reports; all found positive outcomes in withdrawal and cannabis-dependence symptoms (Crippa et al., 2013; Trigo et al., 2016b; Shannon & Opila-Lehman, 2015). Mean age in the case series was 35 years, although the first participant was 19 years old and the second was 27 years old. The case series used self-titrated nabiximols at a dose of 77.5–113.4 mg THC and 71.5–105.0 mg CBD (Trigo et al., 2016b). Moreover, all participants reported a significant reduction in craving (Crippa et al., 2013; Trigo et al., 2016b; Shannon & Opila-Lehman, 2015), quicker relief (Crippa et al., 2013), lower anxiety, and an improved sleep schedule (Shannon & Opila-Lehman, 2015). However, the case series reported increased craving scores during the first 2 weeks with a subsequent reduction in craving at week 9. CBD was well-tolerated in this patient population, except for decreased appetite reported in one study (Trigo et al., 2016b). For patients receiving nabiximols or CBD, treatment should be augmented with psychotherapeutic modalities considering the positive evidence for an effect on cravings.

In a clinical trial, Hallak and colleagues suggested an improvement in schizophrenia-associated cognitive impairment with a CBD dose of 300 mg/day, while no significant improvement was seen at a CBD dose of 600 mg/day (Hallak et al., 2010). In another RCT, McGuire and colleagues found that CBD (1000 mg/day) improved positive psychotic symptoms, but failed to improve negative symptoms and general psychopathology associated with this illness (McGuire et al., 2018). In another RCT, Boggs and colleagues found that CBD (600 mg/day) failed to improve outcomes pertaining to reasoning and problem-solving domains (Boggs et al., 2018).

The cannabis plant has more than 140 cannabinoid compounds, with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) attracting significant interest (Citti et al., 2018). Δ9-THC is the primary psychoactive ingredient, and CBD is a non-intoxicating ingredient (Zuardi, 2006; Citti et al., 2018). Evidence from preclinical studies suggested that CBD had potential therapeutic benefits ranging from antiinflammatory to neuroprotective, antipsychotic, analgesic, anticonvulsant, antiemetic, antioxidant, antiarthritic, and antineoplastic properties; for a review, see (Pertwee, 2006). CBD has several receptors and molecular targets. This compound antagonizes the action of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist (Blessing et al., 2015; Peres et al., 2018). The CB1 and CB2 receptors are coupled negatively through G-proteins to adenylate cyclase and positively to mitogen-activated protein kinase (Pertwee, 2006). In addition to CB1 and CB2 receptor activity, CBD is an agonist of vanilloid receptor TRPV1. It also acts as an agonist of serotonin receptor 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A), an antagonist of G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55, and an inverse agonist of GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12 (Peres et al., 2018). Data from single-photon emission computed tomography showed CBD to exert anxiolytic effects by acting on paralimbic and limbic pathways (Crippa et al., 2011). The agonist effect of CBD on 5-HT1A also supports its anxiolytic and antidepressant properties (Russo et al., 2005). CBD inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis and anandamide uptake through its agonist action on CB1, CB2, and TRPV1 receptors (Peres et al., 2018). In addition, CBD indirectly enhances endogenous anandamide signaling by inhibiting the intercellular degradation of anandamide (Leweke et al., 2012). This endogenous neurotransmitter exerts antipsychotic effects in patients with schizophrenia (Leweke et al., 2012).

Schizophrenia and psychosis in Parkinson’s disease

CBD and CBD-containing compounds such as nabiximols were helpful in alleviating psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairment in patients with a variety of conditions, and several studies provided evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of cannabis withdrawal and moderate to severe cannabis use disorder with Grade B recommendation. There is Grade B recommendation supporting the use of CBD for the treatment of schizophrenia, social anxiety disorder and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Grade C recommendation exists for insomnia, anxiety, bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and Tourette syndrome. These recommendations should be considered in the context of limited number of available studies.

Adverse effects were reported in four of the studies, and included muscular seizures and spasms (Cooper et al., 2017), somnolence and changes in appetite (Barchel et al., 2018), fatigue, and sexually inappropriate behavior in a patient with developmental disorder (Shannon et al., 2019), mild sedation (Zuardi et al., 2010), and mild xerostomia (Pichler et al., 2019).

CBD is postulated to improve cognitive performance in psychosis through the mediation of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonism at lower concentrations (Hallak et al., 2010; Solowij et al., 2018; Manseau & Goff, 2015). This cognitive improvement has been hypothesized due to the higher concentration of cannabinoid receptors in the hypothalamus, suggesting a role in superior cognitive functioning (Hallak et al., 2010). Naturalistic studies of CBD report better cognitive performance including memory, increased grey matter in the hippocampus, and fewer psychotic symptoms in patients given higher doses of CBD (Solowij et al., 2018).

The pharmacokinetic profile of CBD has been extensively explored in the existing literature. A recently published systematic review of the pharmacokinetics of CBD found that the area under curve (AUC0 − t) and maximum serum concentration (Cmax) occurs between 1 and 4 h (Millar et al., 2018). The AUC0 − t and Cmax reach maximum values faster after smoking or inhalation compared to oral or oromucosal routes. Bioavailability was 31% after smoking, but no other studies reported the absolute bioavailability of CBD after other routes in humans. The half-life of CBD ranges between 1.4 and 10.9 h after oromucosal spray and 2–5 days after chronic oral administration (Millar et al., 2018). Fed states and lipid formulations increase Cmax (Millar et al., 2018). The bioavailability of oral CBD ranges between 11 and 13%, compared to 11 to 45% (mean 31%) via inhalation (Scuderi et al., 2009). CBD is well-tolerated, yet despite a relatively lower risk of drug–drug interactions, it should be used cautiously in combination with drugs metabolized by the CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 pathways, and the substrates of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 (Millar et al., 2018). The clinical relevance of these interactions needs to be explored in future studies (Brown & Winterstein, 2019).

Anxiety and depression are pathologies that affect human beings in many aspects of life, including social life, productivity and health. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent non-psychotomimetic of Cannabis sativa with great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. The aim of this study is to review studies of animal models using CBD as an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like compound. Studies involving animal models, performing a variety of experiments on the above-mentioned disorders, such as the forced swimming test (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Vogel conflict test (VCT), suggest that CBD exhibited an anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects in animal models discussed. Experiments with CBD demonstrated non-activation of neuroreceptors CB1 and CB2. Most of the studies demonstrated a good interaction between CBD and the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor.