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cbd claims

Despite the 2018 Farm Bill removing hemp — defined as cannabis and cannabis derivatives with very low concentrations (no more than 0.3% on a dry weight basis) of THC — from the definition of marijuana in the Controlled Substances Act, CBD products are still subject to the same laws and requirements as FDA-regulated products that contain any other substance.

Misleading, unproven, or false claims associated with CBD products may lead consumers to put off getting important medical care, such as proper diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. For that reason, it’s important to talk to your doctor about the best way to treat diseases or conditions with available FDA-approved treatment options.

Unanswered questions about the science, safety, and quality

Unlike the FDA-approved CBD drug product, unapproved CBD products, which could include cosmetics, foods, products marketed as dietary supplements, and any other product (other than Epidiolex) making therapeutic claims, have not been subject to FDA evaluation regarding whether they are effective to treat a particular disease or have other effects that may be claimed. In addition, they have not been evaluated by the FDA to determine what the proper dosage is, how they could interact with other drugs or foods, or whether they have dangerous side effects or other safety concerns.

In addition, CBD can be the cause of side effects that you might notice. These side effects should improve when CBD is stopped or when the amount used is reduced. This could include changes in alertness, most commonly experienced as somnolence (sleepiness), but this could also include insomnia; gastrointestinal distress, most commonly experienced as diarrhea and/or decreased appetite but could also include abdominal pain or upset stomach; and changes in mood, most commonly experienced as irritability and agitation.

The FDA is concerned that people may mistakenly believe that using CBD “can’t hurt.” The agency wants to be clear that we have seen only limited data about CBD’s safety and these data point to real risks that need to be considered. As part of the drug review and approval process for the prescription drug containing CBD, it was determined that the risks are outweighed by the benefits of the approved drug for the particular population for which it was intended. Consumer use of any CBD products should always be discussed with a healthcare provider. Consumers should be aware of the potential risks associated with using CBD products. Some of these can occur without your awareness, such as:

Media coverage and social media interest in CBD containing products has increased in recent years, resulting in a significant uplift in consumer awareness and interest in this type of product. This could be primarily due to its purported health or medicinal benefits. CAP understands that there are a variety of CBD containing products on the market and that most of them are taken orally (as drops, capsules or tablets etc.). We also understand that some CBD products also contain other ingredients.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has taken the positon that CDB containing products which are taken for a medicinal purpose should be treated as medicines and would need to be licensed as such. Ads which present CBD products as medicines or as having a medicinal effect therefore trigger the need for those products to be licensed as medicines.

What is CBD?

It is possible that some CBD containing products may also contain trace levels of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and/or other controlled substances. Marketers are advised to read this factsheet which has been produced by the Home Office and seeking specialist legal advice before taking any further steps to bring a CBD product to market.

It remains a marketer’s responsibility to establish which Regulatory regime applies to their individual product in order to establish if and how the product can be marketed. The Regulatory regime to which a product belongs directly affects whether and which Section(s) of the CAP Code will apply.

The Regulatory definition of CBD products is complex and may depend on a number of factors. This means there isn’t a ‘one size fits all’ definition that can be applied across all CBD containing products. However, CAP understands that CBD containing products which are taken orally tend to either be defined as Medicines or as Foods, both of which are covered by complex Regulatory regimes.

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. More broadly, it requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, it requires the respondents to pay the FTC $75,000 and notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

Steves Distributing, LLC

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs without human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. It also requires competent and reliable scientific evidence for other health-related product claims, and prohibits the respondents from misrepresenting the cost of any good or service and from charging consumers without their express, informed consent. Finally, it requires the corporate respondents and individual respondent Marcello Torre to pay $20,000 to the FTC and to notify consumers of the Commission’s order.

The FTC will publish a description of the consent agreement package in the Federal Register soon. The agreement will be subject to public comment for 30 days after publication in the Federal Register after which the Commission will decide whether to make the proposed consent order final. Instructions for filing comments will appear in the published notice. Once processed, comments will be posted on Regulations.gov.

“The six settlements announced today send a clear message to the burgeoning CBD industry: Don’t make spurious health claims that are unsupported by medical science,” said Andrew Smith, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Otherwise, don’t be surprised if you hear from the FTC.”

Epichouse LLC (First Class Herbalist CBD)

The proposed administrative order settling the FTC’s charges prohibits the respondents from making certain prevention, treatment, or safety claims about dietary supplements, foods, and drugs, unless they have the human clinical testing to substantiate the claims. More broadly, it requires them to have competent and reliable scientific evidence when making any other health-related product claims. Finally, the order requires the respondents to notify consumers of the Commission’s order.