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cannabis oil for chronic pain

You can also vape a CBD isolate or broad spectrum oil, which should not induce a high.

Vaping has become a popular form of taking CBD. Unlike rolling a joint, vaping involves a CBD oil cartridge that is inserted into a vaping pen. While some may assume that vaping is safer than smoking, there are dangers associated with both practices regarding lung health.

Your Natural Endocannabinoid System Supports CBD

How to Buy a CBD Product

Full Spectrum CBD products maintain the full profile of the marijuana plant and in addition to CBD, contain a variety of other cannabinoids including: THC, CBDa, CBG, and CBN, as well as terpenes and other compounds such as flavonoids, proteins, phenols, sterols, and esters. Technically, full spectrum products can contain 0.3% or less THC, if they are derived from the hemp species, however, full spectrum CBD products derived from non-hemp marijuana tend to have a wider cannabinoid and terpene profile.

Clear? You likely still have questions. Read on for specific products and which symptoms they aid.

Remember that CBD use for pain and related symptoms is not an exact science, so you may need to try more than one brand and method before feeling relief. The good news is that, to date, CBD is not considered to be physically addictive, and there’s no history of anyone overdosing on it, so a little trial and error likely won’t hurt as long as you are sourcing safely.

Ingesting CBD can be more beneficial for people with systemic inflammatory conditions (such as rheumatoid arthritis or Multiple Sclerosis [MS]), autoimmune conditions, and full body pain, caused by neurological conditions such as fibromyalgia or cancer pain.

Some of these people wish to avoid the side effects frequently associated with standard pain medication, such as damage to the liver and kidneys, while others have concerns about becoming dependent on such medications.

Chronic pain is the most common reason for medicinal cannabis use, according to a recent survey.   If you have a chronic pain condition and have not been able to manage it with standard treatment (or wish to avoid the adverse effects of other medications), you may be considering CBD oil for pain relief.

Animal-Based Research

Lana Butner, ND, LAc, is a board-certified naturopathic doctor and licensed acupuncturist in New York City.

If you’re thinking of trying CBD oil for pain relief (and it is legal where you live), talk to your doctor to discuss whether it’s appropriate for you and the safest way to incorporate it into your pain management plan. Keep in mind that due to the lack of regulation, the purity and content of CBD oil products can vary.

Some proponents suggest that CBD oil could provide a solution to opioid addiction as concerns over opioid overdoses continue to escalate.

So far, pharmaceutical CBD is only approved by the FDA as adjunct therapy for the treatment of a special and rare form of epilepsy. Currently, CBD alone is not approved for treatment of pain in the United States. But a combination medication (that contains both THC and CBD in a 1:1 ratio) was approved by Health Canada for prescription for certain types of pain, specifically central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and the treatment of cancer pain unresponsive to optimized opioid therapy. There is currently no high-quality research study that supports the use of CBD alone for the treatment of pain.

Given the rapid change in the legality of cannabis coupled with the increased appetite for something new, and driven by unprecedented profit margins, the advertising for cannabinoids in general and CBD in particular has gone wild. The FDA is very clear that it is illegal to market CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement. And it warns the public about its potential side effects, as it’s often advertised in a way that may lead people to mistakenly believe using CBD “can’t hurt.” CBD can cause liver injury, and can affect the male reproductive system (as demonstrated in laboratory animal studies).

Why is CBD presented to the public this way, when it is not without risks?

Most importantly, CBD can interact with other important medications like blood thinners, heart medications, and immunosuppressants (medications given after organ transplantation), potentially changing the levels of these important medications in the blood and leading to catastrophic results, including death. Also, more information needs to be gathered about its safety in special populations such as the elderly, children, those who are immunocompromised, and pregnant and breastfeeding women.

If you or someone close to you is considering trying CBD, I would recommend Dr. Robert Shmerling’s advice about the dos and don’ts in choosing an appropriate product. Until there is high-quality scientific evidence in humans, it is difficult to make a recommendation for the regular use of CBD in chronic pain management.

Given its promising results in animal models, along with its relative safety, non-psychoactive properties, and low potential for abuse, CBD is an attractive candidate to relieve pain. Unfortunately, there is a lack of human studies about the effectiveness of CBD. However, there is an abundance of commercial advertisements about the magical effects of CBD, and it is frequently presented as a cure-it-all potion that will treat everything including diabetes, depression, cancer, chronic pain, and even your dog’s anxiety!