Can Good Weed Have Seeds

ILGM

Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

» WSSA » Weeds » Articles on Garden Weeds » NEVER LET ‘EM SET SEED Have you ever wished you could grow vegetables without hours of weeding? If you are like most gardeners, I bet you have. The How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The

» WSSA » Weeds » Articles on Garden Weeds » NEVER LET ‘EM SET SEED

Have you ever wished you could grow vegetables without hours of weeding? If you are like most gardeners, I bet you have. The good news is that with a bit of dedicated effort, you can reduce the weeding you do year by year until your vegetable garden is virtually weed-free.

Have you ever wished you could grow vegetables without hours of weeding? If you are like most gardeners, I bet you have. The good news is that with a bit of dedicated effort, you can reduce the weeding you do year by year until your vegetable garden is virtually weed-free.

The key is to know a bit about something called the “weed seed bank” and how to manage it. Most people don’t realize that a weed can produce literally thousands – or even millions – of seeds per plant. Early in my career as a university professor, I conducted research to document the number of seeds coming from even a single weed plant. The accompanying chart shows the results were pretty stunning. And all those seeds fall to the ground and become part of a “seed bank” that fuels new weed growth.

The weed seed bank is central to the “never let ’em set seed” rationale. Seeds “in the bank” can remain viable for quite a long time and sprout when conditions are right. That means it will take several years for you to reach your weed-free goal.

How many years? The answer depends on the weed species growing in your garden. Seeds of most annual weedy grasses die after two or three years, but some broadleaf weed seeds can last for decades. On average, though, the bulk of your weed seed bank will be depleted in about five years if no additional seeds are added. That means diligence is the key. Never let one weed go to seed or you will be back to square one!

See also  How Often Do You Water Your Weed Seeds

What about seeds blown onto your garden or dropped there by birds? They shouldn’t be a big problem. The seeds for most weed species drop directly to the ground, close to the mother plant. There are only a few bad actors with windborne seed, such as dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus) and groundsel (Senecio vulgaris). And it is rare for annual weed seeds to be spread by birds. It’s a bit of gardening lore that isn’t substantiated by fact.

To hasten the path to a weed-free garden, I recommend a two-pronged strategy: drive down the number of viable seeds in the soil and quickly intervene when those that remain sprout. I grow between 70% and 80% of the vegetables my wife and I eat, and I now spend almost no time weeding them. I have managed to drive down the seed bank using solarization, mulching, hoeing and hand pulling. In case you haven’t heard of solarization, it involves covering the soil with a clear plastic tarp for several weeks in the summer to heat the soil and kill weed seeds. It may sound farfetched, but it works.

While there is never a 100% guarantee in the natural world, if you follow a “never let ’em set seed” strategy, I can virtually guarantee that you will soon be doing a lot less weeding in future years.

This column is provided as a courtesy by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA). The author Robert Norris is an avid gardener and a professor emeritus in the Plant Sciences at the University of California at Davis.

Examples of Weed Seed Production per Plant*
Weed name Seeds per plant Where the plant
was located
Barnyardgrass, Echinochloa crus-galli 750,000 Davis, CA
Purslane, Portulaca oleracea > 2,000,000 Davis, CA
Black nightshade, Solanum ptycanthum > 800,000 Rosemount, MN
Puncturevine, Tribulus terrestris > 100,000 Pullman, WA
Powell amaranth, Amaranthus powellii 268,000 Freeville, NY
Shepherd’s purse, Capsella bursa-pastoris 40,000 Sheffield, UK
Chickweed, Stellaria media 25,000 Rothamsted, UK

* Data collected by various researchers around the globe.

A Note about Perennial Weeds

Most of the perennial weeds that plague perennial flower gardens and lawns need more than the “never let ’em set seed” rule for effective control. Many perennial weeds grow from underground roots or tubers – making the path to weed-free perennial gardening much tougher. Not only should you prevent seed production, but you need to control the roots and tubers, too. Frequent removal of the shoots of perennial weeds will eventually starve and kill the underground tissues. You’ll need to be especially persistent and use a variety of control methods to reach your goal. If necessary, this can also be achieved with the careful use of appropriate herbicides.

See also  Medical Cannabis Seeds

How To: Spot Top-Shelf Quality Cannabis

How else would you know if that avocado is ripe enough without examining it closely or giving it a good squeeze… you know getting your senses involved. The same applies to weed. You need to get your senses involved. That’s one of the reasons we hate the new trend of putting weed in glass jar tin cans. They don’t allow you to examine the weed before purchasing it. But that’s another discussion for another day.

A guide to ensuring you’re not getting jerked + actually are getting top-shelf cannabis:

Smell it.

You never want your weed to have a grassy, hay smell or smell of ammonia. That’s an instant sign of some low-quality bud. Either it wasn’t dried properly, cured properly or a mixture of both. Always looks for some type of a distinct smell — pungent, citrus-y, pine-y, diesel. Something that is pleasing to the nose. Make sure it doesn’t smell like chemicals. How would you know? You’d be able to tell. Chemicals hit the nose in an unnatural way. There’s a big difference between the smell of a diesel, pungent aroma vs. a chemical aroma. If the smell makes you go ‘mmmm…’, you should be straight.

Examine it.

Cannabis is a plant. It should look pretty. Is it heavy in trichomes? Trichomes are those tiny little crystals that usually cover the bud. They tend to be shiny, sticky + always carry the most amazing aromas. If the bud isn’t covered in a blanket of frost, it’s not it. Has it been trimmed properly? Weed that hasn’t been properly trimmed are usually signs of a rushed job. If they’re cutting corners on manicuring the weed for bag appeal, where else did they cut corners? Does it contain any seeds? Top-shelf bud should be sinsemilla—it should never contain seeds. If you find a seed, that just means some issues came about during its growth cycle, but it shouldn’t be too big of an issue. If you find a seed in a strain you like, save it. If you find multiple seeds, that’s a major red flag that the bud is not high quality.

See also  Is It Illegal To Bring Weed Seeds On A Plane
Touch it.

You may not always get to touch the bud, but when you do check for freshness + density. You never want bud that feels a bit too moist or too dry where it’s crumbling. The former could mean it wasn’t properly dried and the latter could mean it hasn’t been properly stored. Always opt for buds that are sticky to the touch with a bit of weight. Some strains are light + airy, while others are denser. The main thing to look out for is a bud that’s too light or too airy. That is a sign of not receiving enough light during the flowering phase resulting in a less potent bud.

Is the price reasonable or too good to be true?

In New York City, an eighth of quality bud can cost anywhere from $50-$75. From your local dealer, $40 is a reasonable deal. If you’re paying less than $40 for an eighth, you’re more than likely getting some mids. Be wary of $25 eighths. While it’s definitely smokable, there’s probably something wrong with it in terms of overall quality—not potent enough, wasn’t cured properly, dried out, etc. If you’re paying more than $60 + it’s in a branded bag, find a new person. Don’t waste your time on whatever Gelato they just put in a branded bag.

Did we miss anything?
Got tips to add to this list? Let us know.

Affiliate Disclosure: SMK BRK may be an affiliate for products we recommend. If you buy those items through our links, we may earn a commission. You will never pay more when buying a product through our link. We only recommend products that we use and are genuinely interested in.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 4 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.